Any Given SUNday

Recently, I took some time to soak up the while working to achieve my first official tan lines to get the Summer season started. I did my very best to avoid getting sun burn, but failed miserably. Instead of enjoying a new set of tan lines, I was slathering aloe vera all over my charred skin and wondering what I did wrong. I was trying to be so careful to avoid this.

Here are a few things I noticed, so take note as it might help you with sun safety and avoiding sun burns.

Always wear sunscreen

This seems like an obvious one, but I was shocked when I was laying out with my friends by the pool and they were not applying sunscreen as they wanted to get some ‘good color.’ You will still get tan, but less skin damage with a sunscreen.

Check the expiration date

Make sure you are using sunscreen within the suggested timeframe. If not, then it’s time to toss it and refresh your stock. Sunscreen (like most other things that expire) will not be effective past this date.

Re-apply

Just because it’s waterproof and water-resistant doesn’t mean you don’t have to re-apply. ALWAYS RE-APPLY and do it often. You should put sunscreen on at least 30 minutes prior to sun exposure and re-apply at least every two hours, maybe more often if you are swimming, sweating, etc.

Look for sunscreens labeled ‘broad spectrum’

Only sunscreens that pass a new test of UVA protection can be labeled “broad spectrum,” a claim that will indicate that the product protects equally against UVB (turns skin red and causes cancer) and UVA (ages the skin and causes cancer) rays. The new season of Beautyfix has an awesome broad spectrum sunscreen called  Gytone Spray Mist Broad Spectrum SPF 50. This sunscreen is a non-greasy formula that hydrates & protects the skin without clogging pores. It helps to prevent the signs of aging due to sun exposure.

Don’t let the SPF fool you

SPF only refers to protection against UVB rays, the ones responsible for burning the skin. It doesn’t have anything to do with protection against UVA rays that penetrate the skin deeper and can lead to skin cancer. This is why it’s important to look for broad spectrum. The EWG recommends purchasing sunscreens with SPFs higher than 15 but no greater than 50.Often times sky-high SPFs can give us a false sense of security. Many doctors argue that a higher number tricks people into thinking their sunscreen lasts longer than one with a lower SPF, causing them to reapply less often, so they’re more at risk for burns.

Stay in the shade

Sunscreen is just one factor of an overall plan for skin protection. It’s also important to stay in the shade as much as possible and wear protective clothing like hats and long sleeves. This is not the most ideal way to get a ‘good color’ but it will help with keeping your skin healthy, hydrated and protected.

Share

Tags: , ,

Leave a Reply